Welcome to the writings of Edward Durand

Edward Durand Writer

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Books by and about my family and ancestors

A Deep Stream -  7 Generations of My Family’s Poetry 
The Durand Baronets and their ancestors by Sir Edward Durand


A Deep Stream

7 Generations of My Family’s Poetry

Featuring selected works of Eva Gore-Booth, Reginald Heber,

Marion Campbell and various Durands

Compiled by Edward Durand


Introduction

Reginald Heber (1783 – 1826)

From Palestine

The Passage of the Red Sea

Holy, Holy, Holy

The World Before The Flood

From Morte D’Arthur

From The Masque of Gwendolen

Fragment on Alchemy

Epiphany


Edward (Law) Durand (1845–1920)

From Cyrus the Great King

From Lucilla


Eva Gore-Booth (1870-1926)

Salvator Mundi

Radium

Leonardo Da Vinci

The Hidden Purpose

“I”

The Artist in War Time

The World is Round
The Well Where The World Ends

The Living And The Dead
A Round Pebble From The Brook

That They May Be One

The Divine Listener
Sabbath

Opposites


Sarah Wynne (18??-1903)

The Tree

Ill habits gather

Each one by thy example draw

Disappointment

The Modern Bayard

As late one back its foamy track


Mortimer Durand (1898-1969)

Three Fragments

Gypsy Thoughts

Song

Life’s Minstrelsy

A Dedication

To a Flower

Silent, Remote….

We are as Trees

I would have Builded….

Steadfast Mountains

Poems at Parting

Dawn in the Bermudas

My Wedding

Sonnet


Tom Durand (1900-1961)

“So through the driving clouds the sun again”

“Put you off the sloth of waiting

“The sunset’s glow behind us; in the trees”

Sing on, O south west wind

“When last I saw these hills the breath of spring

“Have you a song for men

Kentish Morning

“There’s all the world to sing”

From In Memoriam R.H.H.S.

“Not with the gale, O God

The Road

“Once would come to me by night

Sanctuary

Nocturne


Marion Campbell (1919-2000)

The Archaic Smile

Levavi Oculos

Erik of Greengarth’s Song

Up the Airy Mountain

Envoi: Island Years

From The Dark Twin

‘Oh, I am the Clever Miss Somebody


Dickon Durand (1934-1992)

The Lord of Life

Stranger in a Southland

Apocalypse


Stella Durand (1942-)

It is in me

Burning Bush

Raindrops

At Dawn a Holy Silence

Prayer of Silence

God's Ears

Smile

Dreams

Womb of Silence

Healing Sounds

Enlarge The Place Of Your Tent

The Sea-Green Girl

Behold My Glory

The Three Magi


Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand (1974-)

Into The Arms Of The Goddess

The Lapis Tablet

The Turquoise Tablet

A Fountain Of Blessings

A Child Of The Universe

In The Garden Of The Universe

The Palaces Of Nature

The Symphony Of Nature

Whispering Willow of Wonder

Solar Gold Trancemutation

The West Wind


Mary Durand (2005-)

When The Wind Blows The Flowers Dance Too

Nature Is The Time

The Song Is Too Beautiful

The Imaginist Creator’s Big Tiger-Lily

The Greatest Tiger-Lily

The Days of the Bees and Fairies

“The World is Great

The Light

Family Tree


Introduction

The journey of discovering the poetry of my family has been a great blessing. To read the poems of eleven poets in my family and find such beautiful, profound inspiration has been a wondrous journey through the poetic expression of two centuries of my family. I found a wealth of expressions of the mysteries of existence, the beauty of nature and the immanent presence of the divine. Seven generations of my ancestors contain some wonderful poets, including the Irish mystic Eva Gore-Booth, the writer of many hymns Reginald Heber, the Scottish writer Marion Campbell and several Durands, including my parents, my daughter and myself. This is not a vanity project of publishing my family’s poetry because they’re my family, but I have found a lot of quality poetry as a hidden inheritance that is deserving of a wider readership. So it is up to me to see that others have the opportunity to share in the experience of such wonderful poetry.

     A common thread that runs through these poems is a love for the Divine. Expressed through recognition of the presence of God in nature and the mystical experience. This thread, or stream, seems also to run through the family, with many bishops, priests and mystics, some among the poets here. There is also in many of these poems a deeper way of seeing the world, whether philosophical, psychological or mystical. Many of them have a touch of the esoteric, supernatural or mythic.

     The secrets of the universe and the wisdom of the ages are sometimes expressed in poetry, which better enables us to see it with all of our being. Like the different mode of understanding brought about by Zen koans or the parables of Jesus, mystical poetry enables us to see not only with the logical side of the brain, but with the whole mind, heart, body, spirit and soul. Where form and substance together produce an effect on the reader that transcends mundane perception and they are transported to the world of the poem.

     Most of these poems have been published before but are out of print. This collection keeps alive those poems that deserve to be heard and shows that the current generations still carry that poetic expression, nectar of the muses of poetry and wisdom. From the historical verses of Reginald Heber and Edward (Law) Durand to the mystical poetry of Eva Gore-Booth and the current generations of Durands, many of them use language that seems to bring the mind deeper. Much of this poetry can bring the consciousness to where we see the world through profounder eyes, with an awe and reverence for the eternal mystery present in the moment, showing the sentience of nature and seeing through the depths of the heart.

     Each poet is introduced with a brief biography. They each have their style, and give a window onto their time. It is a history lesson to see writing from different ages and though they are all related, they span a few different countries: Ireland, England and Scotland being represented in their nationalities and places like Palestine and Persia in the subjects. Reginald Heber and Edward (Law) Durand, the earliest two poets of the collection, have magnificent epic poems, of which I could only include fragments because of space restrictions. Hence the verses don’t always follow each other logically as a story would. They paint a picture on the inner tapestry of the mind and the heart, a picture of a thousand words.

     It is extremely rare for anyone to have seven generations of their family’s poetry, and I feel blessed not only that I have these poems, but that there is such a wealth of good poetry in the family. It is a treasure trove of wonders: mystical gems, beautiful descriptions of nature and well-written nuggets of wisdom. Legendary heroes such as King Arthur and Cyrus the Great are glorified by these bards, and spiritual creatures like fairies, devas and angels recur throughout the poems. This weaves an inner landscape of fairy tales and mystery, the ‘hero with a thousand faces’ (in the words of Joseph Campbell) is the reader as well as the character.

     These poets have poured forth nectar from their souls, which can inspire the hardest of hearts. They wove a creative expression of the timeless mysteries, seen with the eyes of the heart. They describe a mystical union between the self and the divine where there is no separation. As you read through the poems the style becomes less classical and simpler over time, but becomes even more infused with the spirit of mystical union with the divine. I hope you get as much enjoyment out of these poems as I do.


Reginald Heber (1783 –1826) was the Church of England Bishop of Calcutta, he was educated at Oxford University. Reginald is best known for the hymn ‘Holy, Holy, Holy’. He went around India consecrating Churches and setting up schools. He died after plunging into a swimming pool to cool off after giving an impassioned speech against the inequality of the caste system. Although known for his hymns, he had a collection of poems published entitled ‘The Poetical Works of Reginald Heber’ (Philadelphia: E.H. Butler, 1870), from which a Latin poem called Carmen Seculare and an English poem called Palestine won prizes. He was a Doctor of Divinity and Lord Bishop of Calcutta, later of all India and Australia. Rev. M.A. De Wolfe Howe said of him in his introduction to his poetry book “There is no name in the annals of the present century, which awakens so universal and grateful an interest in the religious world, as that of Reginald Heber”.

     The poem Palestine was written before the creation of the modern state of Israel, so it refers to the Holy Land, what we know as both Palestine and Israel (though the distinction is unclear as Israel swallows up more and more of Palestine). The language of this epic poem is archaic but understandable, for example ‘Salem’ refers to Jerusalem. His play in verse ‘The Masque of Gwendolen’ is based on Chaucer’s ‘Wife of Bath’s Tale’ but with the characters of Titania and her fairies and Merlin and Gawain, a new spin on an old plot twist. Arthurian legends are further developed in his epic poem ‘Morte D’Arthur’. Reginald’s poems fall into the Romantic literary period, which is echoed in atypical ways by these poems, such as the love of God. I couldn’t include his love poems because of space restrictions, he has much more important works such as his epic poems.

     According to The Classical Encyclopaedia Reginald Heber was “a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy”. Fifty-seven of his hymns ap­peared in ‘Hymns Writ­ten and Adapt­ed to the Week­ly Church Ser­vice of the Year’ (Lon­don: J. Mur­ray, 1827). Reginald is the great grandfather of Mortimer Durand, the great, great grandfather of Dickon Durand and Marion Campbell and the grandfather-in-law of Edward (Law) Durand. I performed his epic poem ‘Morte d’Arthur’ in its entirety in Glastonbury Abbey where the grave of King Arthur lies.


Reginald Heber (1783 – 1826)

From Palestine

The Passage of the Red Sea

Holy, Holy, Holy

The World Before The Flood

From Morte D’Arthur

From The Masque of Gwendolen

Fragment on Alchemy

Epiphany


From ‘Palestine’

Reft of thy sons, amid thy foes forlorn,

Mourn, widowed Queen, forgotten Sion, mourn!

Is this thy place, sad city, this thy throne,

Where the wild desert rears its craggy stone?

While suns unblest their angry lustre fling.

And way-worn pilgrims seek the scanty spring? —

Where now thy pomp, which kings with envy viewed?

Where now thy might, which all those kings subdued?

No martial myriads muster in thy gate;

No suppliant nations in thy Temple wait;

No prophet bards, thy glittering courts among,

Wake the full lyre, and swell the tide of song:

But lawless Force, and meagre Want are there,

And the quick-darting eye of restless Fear,

While cold Oblivion, 'mid thy ruins laid,

Folds his dank wing beneath the ivy shade.

Ye guardian saints! ye warrior sons of Heaven,

To whose high care Judaea's state was given!

O wont of old your nightly watch to keep,

A host of gods, on Sion's towery steep!

If e'er your secret footsteps linger still

By Siloa's fount, or Tabor's echoing hill;

If e'er your song on Salem's glories dwell.

And mourn the captive land you loved so well;

(For oft, 'tis said, in Kedron's palmy vale

Mysterious harpings swell the midnight gale,

And, blest as balmy dews that Hermon cheer.

Melt in soft cadence on the pilgrim's ear);

Forgive, blest spirits, if a theme so high

Mock the weak notes of mortal minstrelsy!

Yet, might your aid this anxious breast inspire

With one faint spark of Milton's seraph fire,

Then should ray Muse ascend with bolder flight,

And wave her eagle-plumes exulting in the light.

...

Revere the sacred smile of infancy.

Such now the clans, whose fiery coursers feed

Where waves on Kishon's bank the whispering reed;

And theirs the soil, where, curling to the skies.

Smokes on Samaria's mount her scanty sacrifice;

While Israel's sons, by scorpion curses driven,

Outcasts of earth, and reprobate of heaven,

Through the wide world in friendless exile stray,

Remorse and shame sole comrades of their way,

With dumb despair their country's wrongs behold,

And, dead to glory, only burn for gold.

O Thou, their Guide, their Father, and their Lord,

Loved for Thy mercies, for Thy power adored!

If at Thy Name the waves forgot their force.

And refluent Jordan sought his trembling source;

If at Thy Name like sheep the mountains fled.

And haughty Sirion bowed his marble head; —

To Israel's woes a pitying ear incline,

And raise from earth Thy long-neglected vine!

Her rifled fruits behold the heathen bear,

And wild-wood boars her mangled clusters tear.

Was it for this she stretched her peopled reign

From far Euphrates to the western main?

For this, o'er many a hill her boughs she threw,

And her wide arms like goodly cedars grew?

For this, proud Edom slept beneath her shade,

And o'er the Arabian deep her branches played?

O, feeble boast of transitory power!

Vain, fruitless trust of Judah's happier hour!

Not such their hope, when through the parted main

The cloudy wonder led the warrior train:

Not such their hope, when through the fields of night

The torch of heaven diffused its friendly light:

Not, when fierce conquest urged the onward war,

And hurled stem Canaan from his iron car:

Nor, when five monarchs led to Gibeon's fight,

In rude array, the harnessed Amorite:

Yes — in that hour, by mortal accents stayed,

The lingering Sun his fiery wheels delayed;

The Moon, obedient, trembled at the sound,

Curbed her pale car, and checked her mazy round!

Let Sinai tell — for she beheld his might.

And God's own darkness veiled her mystic height:

(He, cherub-borne, upon the whirlwind rode.

And the red mountain like a furnace glowed):

Let Sinai tell — but who shall dare recite

His praise, his power, eternal, infinite? —

Awe-struck I cease; nor bid ray strains aspire.

Or serve his altar with unhallowed fire.

Such were the cares that watched o'er Israel's fate.

And such the glories of their infant state.

— Triumphant race! and did your power decay?

Failed the bright promise of your early day?

No; — by that sword, which, red with heathen gore,

A giant spoil, the stripling champion bore;

By him, the chief to farthest India known,

The mighty master of the ivory throne;

In Heaven's own strength, high towering o'er her foes,

Victorious Salem's lion banner rose:

Before her footstool prostrate nations lay,

And vassal tyrants crouched beneath her sway.

— And he, the kingly sage, whose restless mind

Through nature's mazes wandered unconfined;

Who every bird, and beast, and insect knew,

And spake of every plant that quaffs the dew;

To him were known — so Hagar's offspring tell —

The powerful sigil and the starry spell.

The midnight call, hell's shadowy legions dread,

And sounds that burst the slumbers of the dead.

Hence all his might; for who could these oppose?

And Tadmor thus, and Syrian Balbec rose.

Yet e'en the works of toiling Genii fall.

And vain was Estakhar's enchanted wall.

In frantic converse with the mournful wind,

There oft the houseless Santon rests reclined;

Strange shapes he views, and drinks with wondering ears

The voices of the dead, and songs of other years.

Such, the faint echo of departed praise,

Still sound Arabia's legendary lays;

And thus their fabling bards delight to tell

How lovely were thy tents, O Israel!

….

Then towered the palace, then in awful state

The Temple reared its everlasting gate.

No workman steel, no ponderous axes rung;

Like some tall palm the noiseless fabric sprung.

Majestic silence! — then the harp awoke,

The cymbal clanged, the deep-voiced trumpet spoke;

And Salem spread her suppliant arms abroad,

Viewed the descending flame, and blessed the present God.

Nor shrunk she then, when, raging deep and loud,

Beat o'er her soul the billows of the proud.

E'en they who, dragged to Shinar's fiery sand,

Tilled with reluctant strength the stranger's land;

Who sadly told the slow-revolving years,

And steeped the captive's bitter bread with tears; —

Yet oft their hearts with kindling hopes would burn,

Their destined triumphs, and their glad return,

And their sad lyres, which, silent and unstrung.

In mournful ranks on Babel's willows hung,

Would oft awake to chant their future fame.

And from the skies their lingering Saviour claim.

His promised aid could every fear controul;

This nerved the warrior's arm, this steeled the martyr's soul!

Nor vain their hope: — Bright beaming through the sky, ~

Burst in full blaze the Day-spring from on high;

Earth's utmost isles exulted at the sight.

And crowding nations drank the orient light.

Lo, star-led chiefs Assyrian odours bring,

And bending Magi seek their infant King!

Marked ye, where, hovering o'er his radiant head,

The dove's white wings celestial glory shed?

Daughter of Sion! virgin queen! rejoice!

Clap the glad hand, and lift the exulting voice!

He comes, — but not in regal splendour drest.

The haughty diadem, the Tyrian vest;

Not armed in flame, all-glorious from afar.

Of hosts the chieftain, and the lord of war:

Messiah comes! — let furious discord cease;

Be peace on earth before the Prince of Peace!

Disease and anguish feel his blest controul,

And howling fiends release the tortured soul;

The beams of gladness hell's dark caves illume.

And Mercy broods above the distant gloom.

….

Yes, Salem, thou shalt rise: thy Father's aid

Shall heal the wound his chastening hand has made;

Shall judge the proud oppressor's ruthless sway,

And burst his brazen bonds, and cast his cords away.

Then on your tops shall deathless verdure spring,

Break forth, ye mountains, and ye valleys, sing!

No more your thirsty rocks shall frown forlorn.

The unbeliever's jest, the heathen's scorn;

The sultry sands shall tenfold harvests yield,

And a new Eden deck the thorny field.

E'en now, perchance, wide-waving o'er the land,

That mighty Angel lifts his golden wand,

Courts the bright vision of descending power.

Tells every gate, and measures every tower;

And chides the tardy seals that yet detain

Thy Lion, Judah, from his destined reign.

And who is He? the vast, the awful form.

Girt with the whirlwind, sandaled with the storm?

A western cloud around his limbs is spread,

His crown a rainbow, and a sun his head.

To highest heaven he lifts his kingly hand.

And treads at once the ocean and the land;

And, hark! his voice amid the thunder's roar,

His dreadful voice, that time shall be no more!

Lo! cherub hands the golden courts prepare,

Lo! thrones arise, and every saint is there ;

Earth's utmost bounds confess their awful sway,

The mountains worship, and the isles obey;

Nor sun nor moon they need, — nor day, nor night; —

God is their temple, and the Lamb their light:

And shall not Israel's sons exulting come.

Hail the glad beam, and claim their ancient home?

On David's throne shall David's offspring reign,

And the dry bones be warm with life again.

Hark! white-robed crowds their deep hosannas raise,

And the hoarse flood repeats the sound of praise;

Ten thousand harps attune the mystic song.

Ten thousand thousand saints the strain prolong; —

" Worthy the Lamb! omnipotent to save,

" Who died, who lives, triumphant o'er the grave!"


Edward (Law) Durand (1845–1920) was a writer, artist, statesman, soldier, spy and baronet. He was the son of Henry Marion Durand, the Lieutenant Governor of British India. Edward was also known for the Afghanistan accord. He was the official British Resident of Nepal (what they have when they don’t have an Ambassador or Consulate), as well as living in India, England and America. Edward travelled through Persia and elsewhere in the Middle East and Asia. Both he and his brother Henry Mortimer Durand were known as Persian scholars, his brother also being known for the Durand cup and the border the ‘Durand line’ that Edward worked with his brother on. Edward discovered an ancient stone with Sumerian markings, it was said to have been destroyed in World War 2 but a replica lies in the museum in Bahrain, it is known as the Durand stone.

Edward wrote several books including Ranch in Happy Valley and Ponies’ Progress (which taught people how to train ponies without a whip). I include verses from his Lucilla, a drama in verse (though not rhyming verse like Cyrus the Great King). I also include verses from Cyrus the Great King (London: Appleton, 1906), which is a play in verse about Cyrus, also known as Koorosh'e, Koresh and Kai Khusro. Cyrus was a King of Persia (Iran) who conquered the entire Middle East, freeing slaves, making the first declaration of human rights and quenching the enemies of God, according to his friend the Prophet Daniel. The book runs to some 9,000 lines, four-fifths of which is written in heroic couplets. Occasionally the poet breaks out into another rhyming form. The book is dedicated to Edward’s wife, Maud Ellen Heber-Percy, who was the granddaughter of Reginald Heber.

     Edward is the father of Mortimer Durand, the uncle of Tom Durand, the grandfather of both Marion Campbell and Dickon Durand and the great grandfather of the other Edward Durand in this collection, myself, who was named after this enigmatic ancestor.


Edward (Law) Durand (1845–1920)

From Cyrus the Great King

From Lucilla


From ‘Cyrus the Great King’

Dramatis Personae

Cyrus: The Great, Emperor of Persia, also known as Koorosh'e, Koresh and Kai Khusro.

Daniel: The Prophet.

Shirin: A Hebrew Princess of the house of Jehoiachim, she is also called Nahid and Venus. Wife of Cyrus.

Croesus: King of Lydia (Greek) until his defeat by Cyrus.

Spirit: An angel who comes to assist the passing of Cyrus from this world.


How dust, enchanted, once again should stir,
Quicken dead hearts that share his sepulchre,
When in the days to come his opening eyes
Survey the world, once more a battle-prize.
"For he shall wake, renew the lost renown
Of Persia's past, and raise her splendorous crown;
And there he sleeps."- He pointed to the hill
Which rose above.- "That cavern guards him still.
There with his warriors 'neath the eternal snow
Takes his long rest the conqueror Kai Khusro."...
I looked! against high heaven a fastness rude
Upreared her pinnacle,- sheer, pathless, nude;
A portal grey disclosed the rugged face
Sun-swathed, abandoned to the wind's embrace;
Heaven-stayed, -for sentinel, -or sunlit cloud?
Or guardian flame embodied, might-endowed?
Surely! through faltering lids mine eyes could see
The Immortal form, the blade that beckoned me!
The whilst my hunter's voice, low-pitched, intense,
Persuaded sleep, His whisper woke my sense,
Till, subtly passing, by his armoured side
My spirit stood, where life and death divide.
He took my hand,-"See, for thy sake is riven
The seal of sight, unclasped the scroll of heaven;
Where on earth's path, imprinted, wondrous, glows,
Mirrored in light the world revolving throws,
A picture-miracle on veils of space,-
The immortal records of thy mortal race!
Here be the treasure-house where God-kept lie
The sacred archives of the days gone by."
Spreading his pinions o'er the abyss sublime
We hung, swept upward, in the stream of time;
Till touched my eyes, my ears, the Seraph's hand,-
"Be open - Hearken - See - and understand!"

(Daniel)

Here, the Shekinah, the Glory, the Light of the Presence,
Lies on the mountain, the cavern, a cradle of kings,
Whose radiance around us outpours of its Infinite Essence
A sanction to thee in the sound of the Seraphim's wings.

Bow down, for I bless and anoint thee with oil of the chalice!
Be the salvation of God as a shield to thy head!
Strong be the heart in thy breast as a brazen portalice,
Mighty thine arm as the stroke of a shaft that is sped!

Swift as a leopard's thy feet, and thy voice as a thunder,
Thy rush as the lightning, thine onset the flash of a sword!
Behold! I have given thee a world, thou shalt rend it asunder;
I have holden thy hand, I have called thee the Lash of the Lord

Rise up from thine eyrie, Mine Eagle; I give thee the earth-right
I have screamed to the eastward - thy pinion shall answer in joy
Anointed and blessed of the Lord, to establish thy birth-right,
Rise up in My might, who accord thee the strength to destroy.


Eva Gore-Booth (1870–1926) was an Irish poet and dramatist, and a committed suffragist and social activist. She was born at Lissadell House, County Sligo, the younger sister of Constance Gore-Booth, later known as Countess Markiewicz (the first female member of parliament and government minister after helping to free Ireland from British rule). Eva's poetry was highly praised by her friend W.B. Yeats, who wrote a poem about the two sisters. Though sensitive, ethereal and profound, she was a dedicated reformer as well as a pure visionary and mystic. Eva’s partner was a woman named Esther Roper, also a committed feminist. Eva was the editor of 'Women's Labour News'. Both her and her sister were involved in ensuring the right to vote and own land for Irish women.
     Eva believed in the unity of all things, the unifying force being Love. Her sister Constance said of her "She has left a spiritual inheritance of love and peace to those who can understand, that can never die.... Her human presence was so beautiful and wonderful, but with her the spirit dominated every bit of her and her body was just the human instrument it shone through." Eva’s poems are inspired by mystical traditions and her own mystical experiences. She would sometimes ride her horse all morning, and on her return not know where she had been, she was so caught up in the internal world. Eva sought the hidden beauty in all things and communed with nature in a profound way. The writer Evelyn Underhill said of her "Through this profound sympathy with nature, this deep love for all created loveliness, she obtained a rich variety of significant and concrete symbols; genuine poetic material, loved and chosen for its own sake, by means of which her mystical vision could be given artistic form."

The Poems of Eva Gore-Booth were published by Longmans, Green and Co. of London in 1929. Besides her poetry, other outstanding books of hers include 'The World's Pilgrim' and 'The Psychological and Poetic Approach to the Study of Christ in the Fourth Gospel'. The writer George Russell (A.E.) said of her "I feel you belong to the spiritual clan of new Irish people...(who) know that Tir na n'Og (the land of eternal youth in Celtic mythology) is no dream and that inwardly we are inhabitants of it and breathe a common air." Eva is the first cousin twice removed of Stella Durand, the first cousin three times removed of Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand and a cousin of Sarah Wynne.


Eva Gore-Booth (1870-1926)

Salvator Mundi

Radium

Leonardo Da Vinci

The Hidden Purpose

“I”

The Artist in War Time

The World is Round
The Well Where The World Ends

The Living And The Dead
A Round Pebble From The Brook

That They May Be One

The Divine Listener
Sabbath

Opposites


Salvator Mundi

I gave up all things, and behold all things came and begged to be mine,
Mine is the life of the rainbow, the river, the corn, and the vine
I shine from stars, I flow in streams, I rise up from the earth in trees
My vision, enthroned beyond all dreams, shines over a thousand seas
My writing glitters in cloud and shower, the blue skies are my scroll
My face is mirrored in every flower, my mind in every man's soul
My Spirit is that thin golden air, still brightness, or wandering wind
Love that flows o'er the wild seas in prayer, or life that enfolds the mind.
It shelters the lonely dreams of men, and holds up the skylark's wing
For deep in my boundless heart is the heart of every living thing
I give my Dream to the outcast, the slave, or the king on his throne
I give my soul to the beggar, I go forth from myself alone.
The sun and the moon and the stars I give, and I grudge to none
I give the whole Glory of God to every man under the sun;
For through my soul there flows the Love that has built up the earth and sky,
And set in the heart of dust and stone a glory that cannot die,
And made a road for the tides beneath, and the wonderful moon above,
And the wind-driven hearts of foolish men, in the calm Heart of Love.
Sunlight and starlight are my dreams, and the twilight deep and still,
For I have given my will to God, and mine is God's dear will.
Mine is the Dream and the Splendour, the broken parts and the whole
For I have given my love to God, and my soul is Love's wild soul


Sarah Wynne (-1903) was the daughter of John Arthur Wynne of Hazelwood House and his wife Lady Anne Wynne. Sarah was a keen painter, having done many beautiful watercolours of Italy and other places. She never married, but moved to Edinburgh where she passed on due to pneumonia in 1903. Sarah and her sister Grace (who also wrote poetry) decorated a ward in the county infirmary in memory of their father. Her obituary in the Sligo Independent said she was well-loved by all classes, and very charitable.

Sarah is a great grandmother of Stella Durand, a great, great grandmother of Edward Durand and a great, great, great grandmother of Mary Durand.

The Tree

“Ill habits gather”

“Each one by thy example draw”

Disappointment

The Modern Bayard

“As late one back its foamy track”


Disappointment

All round the rolling world both night and day

A ceaseless rain ascends to those who pray

“Thy will be done on earth as now in heaven,

Unto our souls a perfect choice be given”.

All round the rolling world both night and day

A ceaseless answer comes to those who pray

By shattered hopes, crossed paths and fruitless pains

Thy heavenly master thine allegiance trains.

Guessing some portion of his great design

Thou seekst to forward it by ways of thine

He who the whole world disposes as is met

Sees a necessity for thy defeat.

Yet to the Faithful there is no such thing

As disappointment. Failures only bring

A glut pang, as peacefully they say

His purpose stands though mine has passed away.

All is fulfilling, all is working still

To teach thee flexibility of will

To great achievements let thy wishes soar

Yet meek submission pleases Christ still more.

When love's long discipline is overpast

Thy will too shall be done with His, at last

When all is perfected and thou dost stand

Robed, Crowned and Glorified at God's right hand

With heart at rest and life love-filled

And your spirit still and free

You can cross the brink of the newborn year

Accepting without a shadow of fear

The future awaiting thee.


Mortimer Durand (1898-1969) was a Journalist, Writer, Sailor and Poet. He served in both world wars (he was a Commander in the Royal Navy), between the wars he was a Fleet Street Journalist. He was the seventh child of Edward (Law) Durand. He was educated at Osborne, Dartmouth and Cambridge. As a journalist he covered the Italian / Abyssinian War, after which he wrote the book ‘Crazy Campaign’ about it. He lived in Ethiopia when he was writing about it and Emperor Haile Sellaise swapped places and moved to England. Mortimer had a novel and a book of poems published and wrote several unpublished musicals for children, which he was unwilling to have published as the publishers were unwilling to include his illustrations.

     Mortimer was a son of Edward (Law) Durand, the father of Dickon Durand, the father-in-law of Stella Durand, a cousin of Tom Durand, an uncle of Marion Campbell and a grandfather of Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand. These verses were originally published in his poetry book ‘Linked Fantasies’ (Westminster: The Merton Press).


Mortimer Durand (1898-1969)

Three Fragments

Gypsy Thoughts

Song

Lifes Minstrelsy

A Dedication

To a Flower

Silent, Remote….

We are as Trees

I would have Builded….

Steadfast Mountains

Poems at Parting

Dawn in the Bermudas

My Wedding

Sonnet


I Would have Builded

I would have builded palaces of thought

With slender pillars rising purple-veined

In misty colonnades that, weightless, feigned

Flight with the gentlest zephyr. I had wrought

Slim, silver spires to mingle with the light

Woven by moon and star-beams through the night,

And golden dusted minarets had caught

The first, flame-coloured, level shafts of dawn

And scattered them like spray.

Anon a faun

With love and wonder in his eyes had sought

A white-limbed Naiad by the lucent streams

Flowing from misty springheads of my dreams

And with reed music all her love besought;

Or through the noontide striven to evoke

A slant-eyed Dryad from a dreaming oak.

From fancy’s wild, bright garden had I brought

Armfuls of blossoms, fresh and strange and sweet,

And in the dawn-light cast them at your feet.

With god-like courage I had set at nought

The guardian sun, riven his dawn-gold bars—

The skies profaned—

And robbed high heaven of her fading stars:

The little meteors I would have taught

To fawn about your feet, your path make bright;

Stars had I hung to throw their silver light

Low in my blue-domed palaces of thought:

Had the great light not waned.


Tom Durand (1900-1961) was baptised Algernon Thomas Marion Durand, but because his father was also Algernon Durand he was usually known by his middle name as Tom. Tom Durand was born on 6 January 1900. He was the son of Algernon George Arnold Durand and Elizabeth Marjorie Bruce. He married Margery Underwood, daughter of J.S. Underwood, on 10 March 1939. He died on 23 July 1961 at age 61, without any children. Tom is buried at Fairmile, Oxford. His poems were unpublished but they show a talent for poetic description.
     Thomas was educated at Eton College, England. He graduated from Magdalen College, Oxford University with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He fought in the Second World War, gaining the rank of Major in the service of the 5th City of London Rifle Brigade. He co-authored The London Rifle Brigade, 1919-1950 (Aldershot: Gale & Polden, 1952) with R.H.W.S. Hastings. Tom also worked as a journalist for the Daily Telegraph. He lived in Marlow.

Thomas is a nephew of Edward (Law) Durand, a cousin of Mortimer Durand and a first cousin once removed of Dickon Durand and Marion Campbell.


Tom Durand (1900-1961)

“So through the driving clouds the sun again”

“Put you off the sloth of waiting”

“The sunset’s glow behind us; in the trees”

“Sing on, O south west wind”

“When last I saw these hills the breath of spring”

“Have you a song for men”

Kentish Morning

“There’s all the world to sing”

From In Memoriam R.H.H.S.

“Not with the gale, O God”

The Road

“Once would come to me by night”

Nocturne



The Road


Now will I rise and take the road again

And leave you, fairest city of delight.

What if my dreams are dead, my hopes in vain?

Soft to the pilgrims are the wings of night.

Behind, the lights. Before, the road half seen

That calls again to unknown lands afar.

Fast closed the gates that held what might have been,

Bright o’er the distant hills a single star.

O deathless token of the hopes of man,

O golden symbol of the days to come,

Remote as when my stormy quest began,

Shine yet a little. Lead me wondering home.

What if alone I fare? A single load

Is mine. And by the way the linnets sing.

No false friend now shall tempt me from the road,

Nor see that meeting which its end shall bring.


Marion Campbell (1919-2000), of Kilberry Castle in Scotland, had 80 books published and as many other drafts written. The subjects were mostly archaeological and historical (including Argyll: The Enduring Heartland and a biography of the Scottish King Alexander III), but her fiction works were also enduring. They include four historical novels for children, including The Wide Blue Road, and a fantasy novel for adults called The Dark Twin, from which a couple of these poems have been taken, and which has been recorded as an audio book.

The verses here are taken from Argyll: The Enduring Heartland (London: Turnstone Books, 1977), The Dark Twin (London: Turnstone Books, 1973) and Yesterday was Summer (Argyll: Argyll Publishing, 2007). The verses from the fantasy novel The Dark Twin echo the Celtic bardic tradition, and Marion’s fondness for the ancient Scottish Celtic tradition. The verse included from Yesterday was Summer (“Oh, I am the Clever Miss Somebody”) is a comic take on her well-to-do relatives’ perception of her. One of the verses included from Marion's best-known book Argyll: The Enduring Heartland, ‘Levavi Oculus’, was read out at her funeral. It reflects her connection with nature: “you heard instead The mountain mosses singing at your tread, And saw the views Heart-lifting…Here is the open heaven”.

Marion is a granddaughter of Edward (Law) Durand, a niece of Mortimer Durand, a cousin of Dickon Durand and a first cousin once removed of Tom Durand.


Marion Campbell (1919-2000)

The Archaic Smile

Levavi Oculos

Erik of Greengarth’s Song

Envoi: ‘Island Years’

From The Dark Twin

‘Oh, I am the Clever Miss Somebody’



Levavi Oculos


“I have been in the hills all day;

“I have not heard the news.”

No, but you heard instead

The mountain mosses singing at your tread,

And saw the views

Heart-lifting, of the shadows in the bay.

Down, down and down below

You looked to where men count the days;

But here, where winter stays

And sudden drops his cloak and turns to spring,

Is no such thing.

Here in the open heaven, spinning and standing fast,

Held on the big tops’ shoulders; here is height

Soaring beyond mortality; and air

That moves eternal there

Which but to taste, teaches delight

And heals time past.

And here the spring-foot doe

Treading across the moss comes curiously,

Here the white hare sits watching from a ledge

And there, the very edge

Of magic, whistling liquidly,

The golden, golden plover wheel and go.

And hark! What others come?

Wild swans, the soul of storm,

Beating their great vans in the sky

And from long golden throats

Sounding out haunting notes,

The trumpets of an older chivalry;

And, tilting in the wind, the eagles

Not of Rome.

But to come down again,

To leave the holy ground and tread the earth,

In from the brightness of infinity,

Casting the lost glow of divinity

Back to distress and dearth,

Cramping beneath the burdens –

God the pain!

Cry, for we left our paradise today;

But when we turn and load

Accustomed burdens, grieving, if we say

“None knows what we forego!”

Then one says, low,

“I, too, joyfully trod my hills and came away,

“And bore a Burden up a stony road.”


Dickon Durand (1934-1992) was educated at Sydney University, Australia, and Salisbury and Wells Theological College, England, studying Theology and English. Dickon was the Church of Ireland Rector of St. Mary’s Collegiate Church in Youghal, Co. Cork. He was also a Rector in the Church of England. Dickon lived in Ireland, England, Australia and Canada. Dickon was a steam train enthusiast and collected trains, stamps and militaria, among other things. As a hobby he also made model boats, planes and soldiers, painted them and made flags for them.

He was baptised Henry Mortimer Dickon Marion St. George Durand but was known as Dickon after a character in ‘The Secret Garden’. This was the favourite book of his wife, Stella Durand. He was afflicted with illnesses, and liver Cancer took him at the age of fifty-eight, but his poetry shows he connected with God through nature. Dickon is buried at Castlemartyr, Co. Cork. He had been writing a novel (‘David and Marita’) when he passed on and his widow finished it. Dickon is remembered as a man of deep kindness and broad knowledge. His poems Stranger in a Southland and Apocalypse were published in ‘The Religious Educator’.

Dickon is a grandson of Edward (Law) Durand, the son of Mortimer Durand, the husband of Stella Durand, the father of Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand, a cousin of Marion Campbell and Tom Durand and a grandfather of Mary Durand.


Dickon Durand (1934-1992)

The Lord of Life

Stranger in a Southland

Apocalypse


Apocalypse

I dreamed I stood upon a lofty hill

And saw the world outspread beneath my feet,

And all the cities since the world began,

And all the greatness that mankind has known.

I had not felt the scorching sun grow near

But now it burned in blood-wed glory on the earth

And melted all the mighty towers of men

And all was hot and dry as desert sand.

And now I walked on dark primeval mud

But left no mark for I did not exist;

For I had seen the ending of the world

Which is, and is not, and will never be.

There was no history, for the world had come

And gone in such a space that none could see

And only mud that boiled should linger on

And that should cease.

I heard a voice that spoke, a voice so vast

It filled the universe, but spoke to me.

It said these words “I was in the beginning

And the end, for only I exist – I am.”

And then I stood upon a plain of golden sand

And there was no horizon or an end

For I had walked upon the sands of time,

But now I walked upon eternity.


Stella Durand (1942-) is a Church of Ireland Rector, writer, scholar, teacher and musician. She studied Theology, Philosophy and English at Trinity College Dublin, the Sorbonne in Paris, St. John’s College Durham, University College Dublin and the Milltown Institute of Theology and Philosophy. Stella is currently doing a Ph.D on Theology of Religion. She was awarded the degree of M.Litt. for her thesis ‘Teleology in the Cosmologies of John Scottus Eriugena and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin’, UCD (2004). Stella is the author of several books, including ‘Drumcliffe: the Church of Ireland parish in its north Sligo setting’ (Manorhamilton: Drumlin Publications, 2000) and co-author of ‘Tidal Dreams’, an anthology of six poets. She has had poetry published in ‘Voices Israel’, ‘The Sligo Champion’, ‘All Boys Can Dance’ and ‘Public Eye’.

Stella has taught Music, Religion, Hatha Yoga, English and French. She continues to teach today as well as her ministry and her studies. She is the mother of Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand, a grandmother of Mary Durand, the wife of Dickon Durand, the daughter-in-law of Mortimer Durand and a first cousin twice removed of Eva Gore-Booth and a great, great niece of Sarah Wynne.


Stella Durand (1942-)

It is in me

Burning Bush

Raindrops

At Dawn a Holy Silence

Prayer of Silence

God's Ears

Smile

Dreams

Womb of Silence

Healing Sounds

Enlarge The Place Of Your Tent

The Sea-Green Girl

Behold My Glory

The Three Magi


It is in me

That song of an unseen bird
Is not among the cedar fronds
It is in me.
Sap rises not alone
In pink stalks, brown stumps,
Grey tree-trunks,
It's in me too.
Atoms dancing
Dances in my veins
Suns rays shine steadily
Through my eyes
Wind blows through my lungs and breath.
Animals rest trusting,
Beneath my fingers.
The cry of the hurt,
The sob of the lonely
The tears of the sorrowing
Well up in me.
The bruises of the beaten,
The down-trodden, the exploited
Are on my skin.
The worlds' dawning joy
Rises in me too.
And when your hand touches mine
In friendly clasp
I see no extra limb
For we are one,
And eyes meet eyes
In a joinedness,
To which all around
Belongs.


Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand (1974-) studied Philosophy, Parapsychology, Herbalism, Journalism and Web Design at the University of Ulster, Milltown Institute of Theology and Philosophy, The National Training Authority and the College of Management and I.T. I also did a module of poetry in University. My poem ‘The Palaces of Nature’ won a bronze medal in the Voicesnet poetry competition. I am currently living in England but I am an Irish citizen.

     I produced, researched and presented the radio programme ‘Mysterious Worlds’ on Anna Livia FM. I have had poems published in a book of ‘The International Library of Poetry’, the magazine of ‘The Milltown Institute’, the fanzines ‘Muse’ and ‘Chimera’, the radio station ‘Anna Livia FM’, and various websites.  I am also a teacher and a freelance journalist. I created the facebook group ‘Mystical Poetry’. My poetry is mystical and philosophical, as with most of the poets here. I am inspired by nature, those who shone in the light of Truth, and my own mystical experiences.

I am the father of Mary Durand, a son of Dickon and Stella Durand, the husband of Anara Durand and am related in some way to all the poets in this book.


Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand (1974-)

Into The Arms Of The Goddess

The Lapis Tablet

The Turquoise Tablet

A Fountain Of Blessings

A Child Of The Universe

In The Garden Of The Universe

The Palaces Of Nature

The Symphony Of Nature

Whispering Willow of Wonder

Solar Gold Trancemutation

The West Wind

The Open Book of Life

The Living Library of Life

A Fountain Of Blessings

Radiant Dawn

The Voice of the Silence

Hazel

Every Tree is the Tree of Life

Cosmic Fire


The Palaces Of Nature

The blades of grass glisten in the sunlight
and dance with the freshening breeze,
reaching out to embrace the sun,
kissed by its loving warmth.
And a glimmer of blue hope stretches across the sky.
As the sun shines through the clouds
the shadow recedes from the landscape
and a smile stretches across the land.
The rains have already nourished and cleansed,
dancing their blessings on the welcoming earth.
The sun now shines in majesty
and the earth reflects its light in glory.
This is that magic land of myth
not all paradises were paved.
The kingdom of light reigns in the palaces of nature.


Amanda Anara Durand (1974-) is the wife of Sir Edward Durand Bt.

She is a passionate poet, writer of fiction and non fiction and singer song writer and dance practitioner. She has a BA Hons. Degree in Fine Art Film and Video awarded from Central St. Martins School of Art and Design in London. She has also studied Acting, Voice and Acting for the Screen at Central School of Speech and Drama. Anar has diplomas in Hypnotherapy, Regression Therapy and is a Reiki Master/Teacher. In 2006 she studied for a Master Degree in Dance Movement Psychotherapy at Roehampton University, London.


Anara Durand (1974-)

Winter Solstice

She

Alban Eilir 

Lá Bealtaine

Lupus 

Risen

Yardana


Winter Solstice


Inner alchemical murmurs

under layers and folds of death

the crawling beasts stir and divide


shafts of light pierce their burrows

the tongue and the dews breath lick at roots

stimulus and ovum spore


perpetual lamentation

silenced by the vociferous carrions call

slicing through dense wood

their path towards the blinding ball


Upon the back laid bare

shallow breath

ice cold


Dawn offers promise of resurrection


Interioris alchymicam murmura

sub stratis et caulas mortem

quod movetur super terram stir bestiis et divides


exsulet lux eis scutum subiit longeque

linguam modo et umida spiritus lambere radices

incitamenta et morula agglu


perpetuus

silebitur tuosque morticinia call

Caduca frequenti silua

eorum iter illud caecos pila


Super dorsum nudantur

leuis spiritus

glaciem frigore


Matutinus pollicetur resurrectionem



Mary Durand (2005-) is the daughter of Edward (A.C.D.P.) Durand and the granddaughter of Dickon and Stella Durand. Although only a young child she displays a love for nature.  She goes to Scoil Iognaid, an Irish-speaking school in Galway known locally as ‘the Jes’. Mary has already won a prize for her book The Mystery of Mistletoe Manor.


Mary Durand (2005-)


Nature Is The Time

When The Wind Blows The Flowers Dance Too

The Imaginist Creator’s Big Tiger-Lily

The Greatest Tiger-Lily

The Days of the Bees and Fairies


The Light


The light loves the sky and the flowers gleam in the sunlight
And the flowers hug the sky with the grass everywhere
On the earth all the time loving the earth even Ireland
With everyone loving all the rabbits too and the trees
Branches LOVING the earth all the time and the light shines
On the earth and the light will gleam in your eyes
And loving you and a blue star will come and it will
Mean you will have a new world coming
And everyone loves you and everyone loves me
And it is very happy


 


Cyrus the Great King by Sir Edward Law Durand


Edward (Law) Durand (1845–1920) was a writer, artist, statesman, soldier, spy and baronet. He was the son of Henry Marion Durand, the Lieutenant Governor of British India. Edward was also known for the Afghanistan accord. He was the official British Resident of Nepal (what they have when they don’t have an Ambassador or Consulate), as well as living in India, England and America. Edward travelled through Persia and elsewhere in the Middle East and Asia. Both he and his brother Henry Mortimer Durand were known as Persian scholars, his brother also being known for the Durand cup and the border the ‘Durand line’ that Edward worked with his brother on. Edward discovered an ancient stone with Sumerian markings, it was said to have been destroyed in World War 2 but a replica lies in the museum in Bahrain, it is known as the Durand stone.

Edward wrote several books including Ranch in Happy Valley and Ponies’ Progress (which taught people how to train ponies without a whip). I include verses from his Lucilla, a drama in verse (though not rhyming verse like Cyrus the Great King). I also include verses from Cyrus the Great King (London: Appleton, 1906), which is a play in verse about Cyrus, also known as Koorosh'e, Koresh and Kai Khusro. Cyrus was a King of Persia (Iran) who conquered the entire Middle East, freeing slaves, making the first declaration of human rights and quenching the enemies of God, according to his friend the Prophet Daniel. The book runs to some 9,000 lines, four-fifths of which is written in heroic couplets. Occasionally the poet breaks out into another rhyming form. The book is dedicated to Edward’s wife, Maud Ellen Heber-Percy, who was the granddaughter of Bishop Reginald Heber.

     Cyrus the Great King is a timeless epic poetic narrative about the most legendary of

historic Kings of the Middle East. Cyrus, also known as Kourosh or Kai Khusro, was

the Persian King who conquered the entire Middle East in the sixth century B.C. He

was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire of what is now Iran. Cyrus freed the

slaves wherever he went, including the Jews from ‘unconquerable’

Babylon. Cyrus also made the first declaration of human rights. The Biblical prophets

Daniel and Ezra depicted him as the hand of God, vanquishing the followers of

demons. He was thought to be Zoroastrian but on the ancient clay Cyrus Cylinder he

appeals to the Mesopotamian Marduk and there is a story of him sacrificing an

animal to Jupiter (Zeus, or maybe they just meant God) before every battle, so

perhaps he honoured more than one pantheon. According to the biblical Book of

Ezra it was Cyrus who ordered the building of the Temple in Jerusalem when he

freed the Hebrews from Babylon. There is a renewed interest today in this heroic

Emperor.


Morte d'Arthur by Bishop Reginald Heber


Reginald Heber (1783 –1826) was the Church of England Bishop of Calcutta, he was educated at Oxford University. Reginald is best known for the hymn ‘Holy, Holy, Holy’. He went around India consecrating Churches and setting up schools. He died after plunging into a swimming pool to cool off after giving an impassioned speech against the inequality of the caste system. Although known for his hymns, he had a collection of poems published entitled ‘The Poetical Works of Reginald Heber’ (Philadelphia: E.H. Butler, 1870), from which a Latin poem called Carmen Seculare and an English poem called Palestine won prizes. He was a Doctor of Divinity and Lord Bishop of Calcutta, later of all India and Australia. Rev. M.A. De Wolfe Howe said of him in his introduction to his poetry book “There is no name in the annals of the present century, which awakens so universal and grateful an interest in the religious world, as that of Reginald Heber”.

     The poem Palestine was written before the creation of the modern state of Israel, so it refers to the Holy Land, what we know as both Palestine and Israel (though the distinction is unclear as Israel swallows up more and more of Palestine). The language of this epic poem is archaic but understandable, for example ‘Salem’ refers to Jerusalem. His play in verse ‘The Masque of Gwendolen’ is based on Chaucer’s ‘Wife of Bath’s Tale’ but with the characters of Titania and her fairies and Merlin and Gawain, a new spin on an old plot twist. Arthurian legends are further developed in his epic poem ‘Morte D’Arthur’. Reginald’s poems fall into the Romantic literary period, which is echoed in atypical ways by these poems, such as the love of God. I couldn’t include his love poems because of space restrictions, he has much more important works such as his epic poems.

     According to The Classical Encyclopaedia Reginald Heber was “a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy”. Fifty-seven of his hymns ap­peared in ‘Hymns Writ­ten and Adapt­ed to the Week­ly Church Ser­vice of the Year’ (Lon­don: J. Mur­ray, 1827). Reginald is the great grandfather of Mortimer Durand, the great, great grandfather of Dickon Durand and Marion Campbell and the grandfather-in-law of Edward (Law) Durand. I performed his epic poem ‘Morte d’Arthur’ in its entirety in Glastonbury Abbey where the grave of King Arthur lies.


The Durand Baronets and their Enigmatic Ancestors by Sir Edward Durand

(working title)


The Durand Baronets have a wealth of interesting and enigmatic ancestors such as Henry Marion Durand (Lietenant Governer of the Punjab), Bishop Reginald Heber and the House of Percy. The Durand Baronets also have an interesting history, especially the first Baronet Sir Edward Law Durand.

     

Edward (Law) Durand (1845–1920) was a writer, artist, statesman, soldier, spy and baronet. He was the son of Henry Marion Durand, the Lieutenant Governor of British India. Edward was also known for the Afghanistan accord. He was the official British Resident of Nepal (what they have when they don’t have an Ambassador or Consulate), as well as living in India, England and America. Edward travelled through Persia and elsewhere in the Middle East and Asia. Both he and his brother Henry Mortimer Durand were known as Persian scholars, his brother also being known for the Durand cup and the border the ‘Durand line’. Edward discovered an ancient stone with Sumerian markings, it was said to have been destroyed in World War 2 but a replica lies in the museum in Bahrain, it is known as the Durand stone.

Edward wrote several books including Cyrus the Great King, Lucilla, Wanderings with a Fly Rod, Ranch in Happy Valley and Ponies’ Progress (which taught people how to train ponies without a whip).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durand_baronets